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the dream of Venice in your life

FIDIA by GAMBARO & POGGI

COD: 022/1018/O

FIDIA
by GAMBARO & POGGI
Large clear crystal cup/goblet with gold leaf.

Mark of Origin

n. 022

Lievi differenze sul colore sono tipiche di una lavorazione artigianale e ne costituiscono un pregio
Availability: ships in 3/4 weeks
Dimensions: H 46 cm
Weight: 4 Kg
€ 990.00
OR

FIDIA

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This spectacular blown Murano glass vase, manufactured with the traditional “ballotton” technique, is inspired by ancient Greek aesthetic. Luxury, nobility and elegance are at the heart of this precious object, further embellished by the gold leaf that brightens the entire surface. A sculptural vase that can make the atmosphere in your home truly magical.

VETRERIA ARTISTICA GAMBARO & POGGI Sas

 

The company "Vetreria Artistica Gambaro & Poggi" was founded in 1974 by two master glassmakers: Mario Gambaro and Bruno Poggi. Born and raised in Murano, they both started working in furnaces from a very young age, developing outstanding qualities.

Their apprenticeship took place in the shadow of the great masters, such as Archimede Seguso and Alfredo Barbini, in high-caliber furnaces like Seguso Vetri d'Arte, Vincenzo Nason and Barovier & Toso.

Gambaro & Poggi is distinguished for its collection of art glass products of classic manufacturing design: big and small masterpieces of high artistic craftsmanship, ranging from classic objects such as glasses, vases, plates, animals and sculptures, just to name a few, to true collector's items made in exclusive limited editions.

While celebrating the typical Murano glass techniques, Gambaro & Poggi has experimented in keeping its objects and creations always current and in step with the times. In 1985, Luciano Gambaro entered the company.

BLOWING

 

Glass-blowing, which most likely originated in Syria between the first century BC and the first century AD, is a glass manufacturing technique that revolutionized glass production times by significantly speeding them up. This may be defined as the "classic" technique for creation of hollow objects.

Glass can be mouth-blown or mould-blown. In the first instance the master, aided by his assistants, shapes the object by blowing through a long hollow metal tube, the so-called "blow-pipe".

The glass is picked up from the center of the oven, blown and shaped by use of a "borsella", a pair of flexible tongs that can accomplish different tasks depending on their shape. Indeed, the borsella can be used to pinch the object, narrow it, remove imperfections, open it up or give it a precise shape.

During this work, the pipe is countinuously spun to avoid warping the glass, as it is still soft at this stage and can be warped by gravity.

 

Mould-blowing, on the other hand, involves blowing the glass into a mould which, in Murano, is built out of pear wood. It can be made out of two or three hinged pieces, used to shape the object, or by a single truncated conical piece, sometimes made of bronze or brass, used to imprint a decorative pattern onto the object.


GOLD OR SILVER LEAF


Precious metal leaves are extremely thin sheets of metal, usually made of pure gold or silver. In glassmaking, the imperceptibly light leaves need to be kept in a sheltered area of the furnace workshop, as even a breath might blow them away.

 

The gold or silver leaf is gently arranged on a flat surface by the master, who then rolls the incandescent blob over the leaf to pick it up; the metal leaf adheres perfectly to the surface of the glass, which is now ready to be blown. Upon blowing, the sheet of precious metal splits to spread over the entire surface of the glass object.

 

The final product therefore appears to be covered in a fine gold or silver dust.


WHOLESALE

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